WEBSITES DEALING WITH FOLKLORE,

STORYTELLING, AND MOTIF INDEXING

 

Using a motif or type index:

http://ils.unc.edu/~sturm/motifindexuse.pdf - Overview of how a motif index works.

http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/ANTH/find/motif.html - Example of how to use the Stith Thompson Motif Index.

http://storydynamics.com/Articles/Finding_and_Creating/types.html - Doug Lipman’s article In Search of the Folktale on using a type index.

 

Descriptions of Unique Resources (but the data are not web-based):

http://ils.unc.edu/~sturm/motifindexbibliography.pdf - Bibliography of motif indices.

 

Specially organized collections of e-stories (there are countless folktale websites with e-stories):

http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/folktexts.html - Huge collection of online stories courtesy of D.L. Ashliman.  Organize alphabetically by topic.

http://www.indians.org/welker/natlit2a.htm - Large collection of stories of the Indigenous People of the US, organized by nation.

http://www.mainlesson.com/index.shtml - The Baldwin Project: bringing yesterday’s classics to today’s children.  Organized by author, book title, story title, and grade level.

 

Specialized electronic resources:

http://www.pantheon.org/mythica.html - The electronic Encyclopedia Mythica (Pantheon Books).  An encyclopedia of mythology, folklore, legends, and more. It contains over 6,000 definitions of gods and goddesses, supernatural beings and legendary creatures and monsters from all over the world.  Browsable and searchable.

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/2591/2591-h/2591-h.htm- Project Gutenberg’s “Grimm’s Fairy Tales, based on the translation by Edgar Taylor and Marian Edwardes.

http://www.mythfolklore.net/andrewlang/ - Index of the story titles from Andrew Lang’s Fairy Books. Includes the e-text of these stories.

 


Web search strategies:

Some web search engines are more effective than others in retrieving sites.  For example, a search on the phrase “german folktales” in 2009 had the following results:

 

Search Engine

Websites Recalled

Google

17,700

Alltheweb

12,400

Yahoo

2,820

Ask Jeeves

756

Metacrawler

48

 

Each search engine treats queries slightly differently, so look at the “search help” link if there is one for your favorite search engine.  Most searches are returned organized by relevance (i.e., the first one should be the most useful), but how the machines calculate relevance varies.  The end result is that a thorough search entails using more than one engine.